TIME/SHARE
Mar
25
6:00 PM18:00

TIME/SHARE

TIME/SHARE, a film screening in collaboration with Chintia Kirana of Expose Art House, Adam Farcus, curator of Lease Agreement (Huntsville, TX), and Jessica Bingham with Alexander Martin of Project 1612 (Peoria, IL). This event is funded through Sixty Inches From Center with support from Illinois Humanities.

Each space has invited a filmmaker to be a part of the event. Screenings will take place on Monday, March 25th at 6 pm local time. Following the screenings will be a Q&A with the on-site curator, filmmaker, and audience. The Q&A will be offered as a live-stream through each respective spaces’ Facebook and Instagram feeds.

Project 1612 invited Josh Roach, a multidisciplinary artist/maker currently based out of Bloomington-Normal, Illinois. His practice is focused around the characters that he becomes through the wearing of hand-made costumes, and the subsequent actions that he performs with objects and other creatures in both constructed and real-world spaces. Recently, this has mostly been through either live performance or video work. Josh is currently pursuing his MFA degree in Sculpture & Expanded Media at Illinois State University. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba in his hometown of Winnipeg, Canada.

Lease Agreement invited Liz Rodda, an Austin-based artist and Associate Professor in the School of Art & Design at Texas State University. Recently her work has been included in screenings and exhibitions at institutions such as Museo de Arte Moderno de Medellín, Colombia; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami, FL; Vox Populi, Philadelphia, PA; and the Anthology Film Archives, New York, NY. More info about this location here.

Expose Art Magazine invited C. DeWayne Cunningham, an artist, director, cinematographer and screenwriter from Beatrice, Alabama. He graduated with honors from both J.F. Shields High School & Alabama State University. C. DeWayne writes screenplays, treatments, directs & edits short films, commercials, promos, music videos & etc. through his production company Carolyn Jean's Son VISIONS. More info about this location here.

Curators and Locations:
Bingham and Martin of Project 1612 will be hosted by Jessica Stephenson of Lit on Fire Used Books, a local queer, woman-owned small business.

Farcus of Lease Agreement will be hosted by 12th Street Bar, where they regularly screen films for "12th Street Screening Series," a monthly curated, guest, and solo video program of moving-image art and short narrative cinema.

Kirana of Expose Art House will host her event at the Art House, a residency and artist-run alternative art space in Montgomery, Alabama.

View Event →
Apr
9
3:00 PM15:00

Anna Fredrick - You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This by Anna Fredrick

I create work that examines the intimate bond of the body and mind. Each piece explores narratives from my past when I struggled to keep body and mind in tune. I piece these narratives together through the use of assemblage and found objects that are deeply personal, including love letters, notes-to-self, receipts, and feminine product packaging. These found objects, collected over the span of a year, portray hope in a time of desperation. Sugar is often used in my pieces to crystalize the hopeful nature of these idols- to make their messages and physical resonance permanent. My artwork is as much a meditative practice as it is a creative act, and offers a physical manifestation of meditation itself- allowing one’s self to examine the stresses of their mind and body without judgement in order to live a life fully aware in the present moment.

Anna Fredrick is a Chicago artist currently residing in Peoria, Illinois. She will receive her BA in Studio Art with a concentration in Graphic Design from Bradley University in May 2017. Anna primarily creates artwork using assemblage techniques, featuring handwritten text and a variety of found objects.

View Event →
Feb
26
3:00 PM15:00

Ben Cook - Image Construction

Image Construction by Benjamin Cook

Statement:
My paintings are made for a digital world, but not one that exists purely online. I explore space akin to that of daily interactions, often structured through, and mediated by, a digital presence. I am interested in how images are created, manipulated and used to construct and extend out own identities within a digital platform. I apply methods of construction rooted in a digital realm to the traditional activity of painting. The processes of drawing on Snapchat photos, rendering layered shapes in Photoshop, cropping, concealing, grids and abstracting palettes from video games or blogs all come together to create images that exist in an awkward, in-between state. They exist fluidly in both a digital and physical world as both photographs disseminated digitally and works displayed in brick and mortar locations.

View Event →
Nov
20
4:00 PM16:00

Richard Medina - Sex Land Power

Sex Land Power by Richard Medina

Statement:
My work takes the form of paintings, sculptures, performances, and videos. In my practice I invest myself in rigid existing structures and use them to generate new work. I have a fascination with the American Southwest as a cultural, historical, geographical, and topographical site. In particular, I am drawn to artwork that deals with the iconography of the West, and speaks to the problematic nature of a space practically designed for hyper-masculine roles and rituals. I find Westerns interesting for this very reason. Films that exist in a vacuum of tropes and archetypes that are purely fictional but are nonetheless trapped inside a historical time period often burrow deeper into their genre instead of attempting to transcend their boundaries, creating and recreating settings and situations. I am also interested in the concept of landscape as it relates to the American Southwest. I approach landscapes through the lens of a road trip: the environment outside the car window is constantly in flux, providing a never-ending, hyperactive vista. I try to avoid sitting with a landscape scene, as one would with a traditional landscape painting, and instead try to embody the ever-evolving panorama of the view outside a car window. The body can also be seen as a type of landscape, with discharge of fluids being connected to environmental systems, such as earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic activity. The stages of a sexual encounter can be read as geological layers of sediment and bodies as topographies. Material-wise, polyurethane foam is an important material to me because it has the ability to create facsimiles of the geographies of the body and the landmasses of the American South. I am also attracted to polyurethane foam for its starkly artificial qualities. When color is added, the polyurethane foam references the masculine, aggressive aesthetic of Abstract Expressionism. Additionally, the process of spraying the foam not only is reminiscent of ejaculation, but harkens back to the earliest form of painting, when early humans would blow pigment onto cave walls. By using these rigid frameworks as a springboard for new work, I am able to create a density of historical and cultural contexts in which my work is able to exist.

View Event →
Oct
26
5:00 PM17:00

Sophie Ansell - Discount Dreams

Discount Dreams by Sophie Ansell

As an artist working in film and performance, storytelling is key to my practice. My work explores narratives. In particular, the stories which are fed to us as a society. Tales of Hollywood Glamour and Benefits Scroungers, Disney Fairytales and The Defecit, Beauty Standards and Austerity Measures. Some of these stories are thrilling, some are simple and some are boring but all are told so subtly and frequently that they threaten to become fact. I use dark humour to question and critique these modern media and political narratives.

I am an obsessive people watcher and find inspiration in everyday absurdities. I like to cut and collage the patterns I find, and re-present them with a sprinkling of subversive humour. Humour and art are, for me, political tools with which I aim to playfully disjoint the powerful fictions which govern our lives.

View Event →
Oct
16
4:00 PM16:00

Jon Henry - VOMB

VOMB by Jon Henry

Jon Henry is an interdisciplinary artist living and working in Harrisonburg, VA. He recently graduated with his MFA from James Madison University and also runs a project space/residency called the Old Furnace.

Exhibition Statement:
For millennia, humans have (unknowingly) worshiped the VOMB. Yet, it was only about 30,000 years ago with the invention of glitter that humans could begin to materialize their devotion and dedication of the VOMB, which lead to further discoveries and devotees. This exhibition gathers together various objects related to the VOMB in regards to the 'myths' of creation, power struggles, and theology.

This exhibition has been organized by VOMB azzpostle , Jon Henry, who maintains a VOMB archive in the Old Furnace Artist Residency.

View Event →
Sep
18
3:00 PM15:00

Joey Knox - YOU ASKED FOR IT

YOU ASKED FOR IT by Joey Knox

“YOU ASKED FOR IT” is an exploration of the significant social value placed on childhood celebrations and milestones. These defining touchstones mask a true identity behind a veil of exuberantly inexpensive decorations and momentary but fleeting joy. Within these constructs, it is expectations that create predisposition and shape our sense of want and desire.

Gender is both established and confined through events like Birthdays. Words, colors, and behaviors begin to have strongly weighted connotations, all of which come to shape much of what guides us in early and later sexual identity.

Through sculptural collage and mixed-media installations, “YOU ASKED FOR IT” presents childhood photos and ephemera which have been manipulated and distorted to challenge the viewers' own perceptions and experiences with identity, intimacy, and notions of desired success.

If we try to distance ourselves and escape the established parameters of our own identity we find ourselves searching through the past, digging through memories, and recalling experiences to look for answers and guidance. “YOU ASKED FOR IT” searches for what lies beneath and beyond the decorative surface.

View Event →
Sep
3
7:00 PM19:00

Project 1612 Film Festival

The Project 1612 Film Festival was be held at the Renaissance Park Community Garden and Heuser Art Center at Bradley University. The film festival was a collaboration with Backspace Collective and Bradley University and featured films from artists around the world including the UK, Canada, Russia, and France. 

1478964397846.png
View Event →
Jul
10
3:00 PM15:00

Patricia Keck - When Birds Sleep

When Birds Sleep by Patricia Keck

I have always felt out of step with the focus of mainstream society. We seem to move forward in such a clumsy way both rebuilding and destroying in the same breath. As a child I would daydream of being someone else leading a life separate from the one around me. As an artist I have become both the participant and the observer. Now my adult daydreams enable me to communicate through gesture and attitude reactions to events that occur in the lives that are common to all people. If there is an underlying philosophy behind my work it is about the integrity of all people and it is still unfolding. Each viewer will bring their own experiences and thoughts when responding to my work. As an individual I strive to value the strength, the accomplishments and the fragility of individuals.

View Event →
Jun
12
3:00 PM15:00

Kaitlyn Hunter and Jake Guzan - Existing Unapologetically

Existing Unapologetically by Kaitlyn Hunter and Jake Guzan

Hunter’s Statement:
There is an inherent discourse between an individual’s perception of themselves and society’s perception of the individual. Ostracism and cultural stigma are initiated by social shame. The concepts of identity and perception are an important commonality throughout my work. It is within the context of "self" that I am investigating the other. I see the combination of the grotesque and the evolution of monster mythology as the physical manifestation of shame. In storytelling, monsters are used as a cautionary device to foreshadow the repercussions of undesirable behaviors or traits. Monsters rarely perceive themselves as such, because it is always a label given by collective social fear. I see a direct correlation between the fear and perception of fictionalized monsters and how we label each other as humans. It is the merging of monster mythology and contemporary "body" politics that thread together the conceptual underpinnings of my sculpture, print and performance based work.

Guzan’s Statement:
For many of us, it’s rare to notice infrastructure, and much rarer to enjoy having noticed it. The manifestations of infrastructure are, when seen at all, interpreted as agents of utility and only utility. They are there to do their job, providing electrical power, water, gas, cell reception, etc, and that’s it. The actual objects that provide these important necessities are just an unfortunate side effect, and we lament their existence. These objects (radio towers, transmission pylons, substations, etc) are seen as interlopers in the environment, as the epitome of the ever-encroaching bastardization of an ideal landscape. They are simultaneously valued as an absolute necessity for the utilities they provide and derided as eyesores, always both necessary and obstructive. It seems we have a strange sort of contempt for these objects, and this contempt isn’t rooted in any sort of informed aesthetic appraisal of them, but in the degree to which they are different from other objects in the landscape. They are inherently different than other manmade objects in that they are not designed with our culturally determined aesthetics in mind. All the other manufactured, or otherwise constructed, objects we interact with or see on a daily basis in our landscape were designed with our gaze in mind, often the culmination of much design and architectural planning meant to not just provide functional utility, but to not offend our visual sensibilities. Because of this, infrastructure objects like electrical pylons, radio towers, or water pumping stations “don’t belong” in our landscape. My argument is that they do belong. The aesthetics of these purely functional manmade structures mirrors those of nature.

View Event →
Apr
17
3:00 PM15:00

Erik Peterson - Ink & Water

Ink & Water by Erik L. Peterson

This was a site-specific and participatory exhibition. Erik made ink drawings with water collected from around Peoria, IL and brought back to the space wood from various locations. He invited viewers to take the wood and build a fire together, collecting the ashes to make into ink.

Erik L. Peterson is a pro-bono public artist, sculptor, curator living in Chicago. He is best known for his large-scale urban interventions (Face Value and Inner State) and signature edible ice cream sculptures (CreamCycle and Soft Palate). Public performances employing sculptural elements like Two Tow'n and Square Dance, are camouflaged urban spectacles, while the annual Southwest Wisconsin Make Your Own Softball League game gathers artists who build their own bats and balls in order to play. Additionally, Peterson is a founder of Hyde Park Kunstverein, a community museum and solo project space in Chicago.

View Event →
Mar
20
3:00 PM15:00

Shrine

Shrine is a collaborative installation by Bradley University undergraduate art students. The exhibition focused on their individual and shared ideas of shrines; they interwove ideas of spirituality, holiness and contemplative states.

Artists included: Kane Fulton, Mason Fulton, Duncan Katlack, Noah Otten, Jeff Wagnaar and Allison Walsh.

12794774_1118505011535345_6937208087425900913_o.jpg
View Event →
Feb
21
3:00 PM15:00

Linda Ding - General Merchandise

General Merchandise by Linda Ding

My work interprets the complexities of mass produced goods and television commercials. Alongside simplified colors and forms drawn from food packaging, my work delves into bridging the consumer cultural divide as a first generation American. I am influenced by television programs such as the Simpsons, Jeopardy, and Wheel of Fortune. Watching television and movies is how I connect to American culture and humor. From infomercials and “As Seen on TV” products, cheap and readily available consumer goods have come to epitomize American standards of abundance and wealth. I continue to seek the symbolic meaning found in objects through their commodity value and representation.

I assemble materials from discarded manufactured products, scrap metal, paint, papier-mâché, cast bronze and aluminum to make sculpture. These material choices are a collected view of my cultural identity through discarded or out of date fashions. I am piecing together a version of American life and experience of immigrants navigating an unfamiliar landscape through an assessment of material value of goods and products.

Product branding and packaging provide a sense of comfort for consumers because they promote convenience and reliability. Establishing trust through an image of everyday tasks made simple, puts a buyer at ease by soothing a consumer through the difficulty of deciding what is the “best” choice. Immigrant assimilation corresponds to this notion because of the many unknown or unfamiliar customs manifested in everyday life. Finding familiarity through consumer products bridges the gaps in language and cultural identity.

Linda Ding is a multi-media sculptor from Cincinnati, Ohio. Her work confronts notions of cultural identity through representations of food imagery from popular American culture. She often integrates elements of her family history and Chinese ancestry throughout her work. Ding received her Bachelor in Fine Arts from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 2010 and later received her Master in Fine Arts from the University of Cincinnati in 2014. Her work has been exhibited at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, Ohio and the Contemporary Art Center in Cincinnati, Ohio as well as Hamilton, New Jersey at the Grounds for Sculpture and Berlin, Germany at the Kunsthochschule Weissensee. Her honors include the 2014 International Sculpture Center Outstanding Student Achievement Award in Contemporary Sculpture. She currently resides in Chicago, Illinois.

View Event →
Jan
3
3:00 PM15:00

Kevin Samp + Brandon Scott

Kevin Samp and Brandon Scott, collaborated on pieces that focused on Samp's mother's diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease. The collection of poems and prints were organized into six categories. Three moved towards making peace with the realities of a terminal diagnosis. Three moved towards defeat, towards allowing an illness to erase the good in life.

Samp's statement:
Some years back, my mother was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. She transformed in ways I couldn’t have imagined. Some were good, some were bad, but as I watched how the illness changed her life, I began to wonder what receiving such a sentence would do to a person’s sense of self. How do you see the world, and how do you feel the world sees you? Although my work explores both victory and defeat, the truth is that any terminal illness isn’t a battle that’s won or lost: it’s one that’s simply fought. These pieces are dedicated to that fight.

This collection of work is organized into six categories. Three move towards making peace with the realities of a terminal diagnosis. Three move towards defeat, towards allowing an illness to erase the good in life. They’re printed using acetone transfer. Rather than create a direct print, I wanted to create copies of my writing to show that I’m speaking for others.

Scott's statement:
My work often deals with the similarities of the micro vs. macro. I tend to gravitate towards organic, microscopic structures and how they influence our larger world. Images taken of the world at a molecular level will at times appear celestial. The use of screen printing allows me to create depth and explore the way in which the separate layers can interact with each other.

This series was a direct collaboration and the first I’ve attempted. Most of the emotions and ideas of this series were designed around the experiences of Kevin Samp. I was the avenue to bring visual life to the words he has written. These two separate works are meant to live together and accompany one another.

Samp and Scott were interviewed after their time at Project 1612 for a short-series called Post 1612. Read their interview here.

View Event →
Nov
22
3:00 PM15:00

James Chrzan

James Chrzan received his BA in Photography from Loyola University Chicago in 2014. His work explores memory and its relationship to sense of place and person. He has exhibited his photographs and video works throughout the United States and is the co-editor of the photography periodical 500 Piece Tiger Puzzle. He lives and works in Chicago, IL.

View Event →
Oct
25
3:00 PM15:00

Adam Turl - Kick The Cat

Kick the Cat by Adam Turl

The installation tells the story of the artist Mary Hoagland, a Peoria native and former member of the 13 Baristas Art Collective, forced to move into her brother's garage after a serious car accident. The title comes from the rank-and-file union newsletter produced by Caterpillar workers in the 1990s. In her paintings Mary tells fictionalized stories of the children and grandchildren of laid-off Cat workers and other residents of the greater Peoria area. This includes a young Mary, who, in a bid to stop global warming, kidnaps Punxsutawney Phil so that he will never again see, or fail to see, his own shadow.

More information about Kick the Cat can be found at Red Wedge.

View Event →
Aug
9
2:00 PM14:00

Sara Peak Convery - Temporary Installation

A Temporary Installation by Sara Peak Convery

Project 1612 has given me the opportunity to re-visit older work, re-create an environmental context for it and integrate it into my current practice. The installation includes previously created work: 3 prints from 1988 (see description below), an oil canvas from 2006/7, and part of a triptych from 2012. The canvas “Sleepless” is one of my rare attempts to paint from an idea without a visual source to reference. “What A Piece of Work Is Man” (2012) was visual amalgamation of 3 disparate photographic sources: a celebrity photo, a snapshot of my grandfather, and an advertisement.

I am an artist who has had a discontinuous practice. In my college years (1985-89), I produced a body of work (paintings and photography) that was primarily sourced from my home and family. Part way through, I made the decision to transfer from my comfortable state school to an art school on the east coast. Unwittingly, I set myself adrift artistically. My creative attachment to home proved much more difficult to overcome than I expected. I was left with my own body as my sole source of inspiration.

In the Winter-session (a short 6 week session between semesters) of 1988, I produced the most successful pieces of my entire year at the school. The class was called “The Big Woodcut”. I created 3-6’ x 4’ print series of 7. All were based on life size brush and ink self-portraits. Two were framed by my aunt, but most remained rolled up for the next 15 years or so. Two of those large scale prints (“Tank” and “Untitled”) were dismembered and incorporated into this installation. In 2012, after I had moved into my own studio space, I continued the process of revisiting old work. I liked paper dolls when I was child, and this prints yielded life size dolls for me to play with.

After college, I did not really paint for nearly 16 years. Though I went through a graduate degree program in photography, I created very little visual work. My thesis was primarily writing based. It was not until 2005 after my father died, that I re-visited my artwork stored in my parents’ attic. I began to paint again in the spring of 2006. At first I was afraid to use oils, which had been my primarily material. But through a combination of availability of canvases to paint over and materials, I returned to it after working in watercolor and ink for a period of time. My working method has shifted by necessity. I still do some self-portraits on occasion, but now I largely work from photographs. These can be family snapshots (both my own family and other found images) and also specifically from images I have taken and composed.

In 2014, I decided to make a concentrated effort to begin showing my work in earnest. I have found venues for many of my pieces, both new and old. Project 1612 has been a great opportunity to expand and experiment.

View Event →